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first_imgWhen employees and employers say farewell, it can be a pleasant or difficult situation.  Regardless, significant risks exist when former employees continue to have access to their previous work environments.  Under the best of circumstances employees will leave the company on great terms.  They could be retiring, starting their own company, taking a well-deserved break from the working world to focus on family or other personal pursuits.   Some may even to return one day as a valued employee.  Other situations may not be as positive.  Layoffs, downsizings, a competitor swooping in with a successful headhunting raid and scurrying off with important talent, can put a permanent strain on the relationship.   It really does not matter the circumstances, when an employee leaves, they take with them inside knowledge of the business and likely important information about the company.  Most of the time this information is limited to memory as employees are usually forbidden to copy or take property when they leave as stated in their original hiring agreements.  Well-handled exit interviews will remind and reinforce this fact.  As part of the exit process all access and credentials should also be removed or changed.  This includes login and remote access accounts, entry badges, email and company social site logins, company phones, and of course all computing devices.   As they no longer represent the company, their access and credentials should be identical to those of a stranger on the street.  It may seem cold, but it is a necessity that protects both the company as well as the departing person as legacy credentials of departed employees can be used maliciously by others as well as the former trusted worker.  It is better for all if they are securely removed.It sounds like common sense, but a recent survey conducted by Harris Interactive on behalf of Quest Software, indicated 1 in 10 IT professionals stated they could access accounts and systems associated with a prior job.   This is a significant problem.  If this percentage were to hold true across organizations, it could represent a serious aggregate risk depending upon the number of people who leave a company. Every organization should have a process to protect the company.  Human Resources, Information Technology, Information Security as well as the manager of the employee should be following an approved checklist to insure consistency and comprehensiveness for every exiting employee.  This process must be maintained and updated to remain effective.  It is critical for access boundaries to be secured from people who do not have a legitimate business need.  Closing the door on former employees is an important task in managing the information security risks of an organization.Reference Link: http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20110216005440/en/10-Pros-Claim-Access-Accounts-Previous-Jobslast_img read more

first_imgThe National Institutes of Health (NIH) and biomedical research groups are jubilant that a federal appeals court today overturned a preliminary injunction that briefly halted research on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) last year. The 2-1 ruling allays months of fears that research could be shut down again, at least temporarily. But the legal battle isn’t over, and the final outcome is anyone’s guess. The case was filed in 2009 by James Sherley and Theresa Deisher, scientists who study adult stem cells. They claimed that NIH’s new guidelines expanding research on hESCs violated the Dickey-Wicker Amendment, a 1996 law barring the use of federal funds for research that destroys embryos. In August 2010, U.S. District Court Judge Royce Lamberth agreed and issued a preliminary injunction that halted hESC funding. The ban held for 2.5 weeks, until the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit blocked the injunction while a three-judge panel deliberated. That long-awaited ruling strongly favors NIH. Writing for himself and Judge Thomas Griffith, Judge Douglas Ginsburg disagrees with Lamberth on one condition for allowing the preliminary injunction to stand: that it wouldn’t seriously harm hESC scientists. The effects on hESC researchers “would be certain and substantial. … Their investments in project planning would be a loss, their expenditures for equipment a waste, and their staffs out of a job,” the decision says. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Importantly, the judges also weighed in on the underlying issue of whether NIH’s interpretation of Dickey-Wicker is incorrect. About half of the 21-page brief is devoted to these arguments, with Ginsburg finding: “We conclude the plaintiffs are unlikely to prevail because Dickey-Wicker is ambiguous and the NIH seems reasonably to have concluded that, although Dickey-Wicker bars funding for the destructive act of deriving an ESC [embryonic stem cell] from an embryo, it does not prohibit funding a research project in which an ESC will be used.” The decision wasn’t unanimous, however. A third judge, Karen LeCraft Henderson, found in a dissenting opinion that her colleagues “strain mightily to find the ambiguity the Government presses.” She calls her colleagues’ separation of the derivation of hESCs and research on the cells themselves “linguistic jujitsu.” (The dissenting opinion is probably why the court took months longer than expected to rule, says professor Hank Greely of Stanford Law School in Palo Alto, California.) The split decision has given the plaintiffs some hope that the full court would be willing to hear the case, according to comments Samuel Casey, one of their attorneys, made to Nature’s blog. (This is known as an en banc hearing.) Greely thinks they would be unlikely to win, however: Ginsberg’s decision “was very well written and clear,” while Henderson’s was “much weaker.” He also notes that three or so of the active members of the full court are Clinton appointees who are more likely to side with the government. Greely also thinks the U.S. Supreme Court would refuse to hear an appeal of Ginsburg’s ruling because the case doesn’t involve a disagreement among circuit courts. That still leaves the underlying case before Lamberth. Last fall, both the plaintiffs and the government filed briefs asking Lamberth for “summary judgment,” which means the facts aren’t in dispute and they want him to decide the case quickly without a trial. Because the appeals court has found that NIH has properly interpreted Dickey-Wicker, “it’s much harder now” for Lamberth to rule to the contrary since his decision would “almost certainly be slapped down” by the same appeals court, says Greely. However, the door is still open a crack to the plaintiffs because the appeals court didn’t weigh in on another of their arguments: that the guidelines are illegal because NIH didn’t follow proper procedures when it developed them. (Greely thinks that argument is weak.) How long will these various rulings and appeals take to play out? The plaintiffs need to ask the appeals court for en banc review within 45 days, Greely says. Lamberth could rule on the underlying case any day—or he could decide to hold a trial, which could take many months. And however Lamberth rules, his decision would likely be appealed to the appeals court and possibly the U.S. Supreme Court. Greely thinks scientists can breathe easy. “No matter how you look at it this was a very good day for the human embryonic stem cell research community. The best chance plaintiffs had was with this [appeals court] panel, and everything from here out is low probability for them,” says Greely. Tony Mazzaschi of the Association of American Medical Colleges isn’t so sanguine. “This will be a protracted fight,” he predicts. “It’s going to be a long time before this is over.”last_img read more

first_imgHuman hunters may be making birds smarter by inadvertently shooting those with smaller brains. That’s the conclusion of a new study, which finds that hunting may be exerting a powerful evolutionary force on bird populations in Denmark, and likely wherever birds are hunted. But the work also raises a red flag for some researchers who question whether the evolution of brain size can ever be tied to a single factor. The new work “broadens an emerging view that smarts really do matter in the natural, and increasingly human-dominated, world,” says John Marzluff, a wildlife biologist and expert on crow cognition at the University of Washington in Seattle who was not involved with the work.Hunting and fishing are known to affect many animal populations. For instance, the pike-perch in the Finnish Archipelago Sea has become smaller over time thanks to fishing, which typically removes the largest individuals from a population. This pressure also causes fish to reach sexual maturity earlier. On land, natural predators like arctic foxes and polar bears can also drive their prey species to become smarter because predators are most likely to catch those with smaller brains. For instance, a recent study showed that common eiders (maritime ducks) that raise the most chicks also have the largest heads and are better at forming protective neighborhood alliances than ducks with smaller heads—and presumably, brains.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Does the same hold true for birds that dodge human hunters? To find out, Anders Pape Møller, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Paris-Sud, assessed the brain sizes of 3781 birds from 197 species brought to taxidermists in Denmark between 1960 and 2015. The birds included pheasants, partridges, wood grouse, magpies, and hooded crows. Danish law requires taxidermists to record the date and cause of death of every specimen they handle. Møller’s co-author, Johannes Erritzøe, a taxidermist and ornithologist at the House of Bird Research in Christiansfeld, Denmark, autopsied each bird, noted its mass, and weighed its extracted brain. The scientists also assessed the birds’ body condition and age at death.They found that 299, or 7.9%, of the 3781 birds were shot. Birds with smaller brains relative to their body size were shot more often, as were larger individuals (which offer a bigger target), and males (perhaps because of their brighter colors). But if a bird had a large brain relative to its body size, the probability that it would be shot decreased nearly 30-fold, the scientists report today in Biology Letters. This held true, regardless of the birds’ health, body mass, sex, and species. Hunters, they conclude, are unwittingly turning their prey into large-brained birds by eliminating those with pea-sized brains from the population.The  scientists also compared the birds’ other internal organs—heart, liver, lungs—and found that only the brain was smaller in the hunted birds. “It means that hunting has a very peculiar and specific effect on the brain and not the other bodily functions of these animals,” Møller says.Hunters aren’t specifically targeting the smaller-brained birds, he adds. Such birds simply aren’t savvy about hunters, apparently lacking the smarts to realize that people with guns are dangerous. “They take longer to fly when approached by someone with a gun, whereas larger-brained birds enjoy the benefit of being wary.” Møller and his team couldn’t track changes in brain size over time, because hunting regulations in many of the study areas have shifted; there are some areas where it was once allowed, but it’s now banned. That could let birds with smaller brains gradually make up a larger part of the population, Møller predicts.“The study is intriguing, but I will remain a bit skeptical because it is based on a comparative long-term data set and not an experiment,” says Jesper Madsen, a population ecologist at Aarhaus University in Rønde, Denmark, who was not involved in the study. “To conclude that hunting selects for larger brains requires more than a correlational study.”Such an experiment is already underway—albeit inadvertently, Møller says. In the last 5 years, the hunting of snipe and curlew has been banned permanently in Europe. Scientists could compare specimens from the earlier hunting period with those collected after the ban to see whether these birds are evolving smaller brains, Møller says. “That’s a predictable consequence of stopping hunting.”Still, Madsen isn’t alone in his skepticism. “My heart drops every time I see another study like this showing a correlation between some factor and brain size,” says Susan Healy, an evolutionary biologist at the University of St. Andrews in the United Kingdom. In 2007, she and Candy Rowe, a behavioral ecologist at Newcastle University in the United Kingdom, assessed more than 50 studies that revealed a correlation between brain size and behavioral traits such as migration, deception, and female promiscuity. They concluded that this type of research did little to advance an understanding of either brain evolution or function.Healy’s and Madsen’s concerns are valid, Marzluff says. But, he adds, the study is valuable because of the questions it raises. “For example, did smarts pay off more for some species than for others? Were similar trends seen in social versus solitary species? That’s what correlational studies do: They generate questions.”Indeed, the authors raise several at the end of their study. To wit: If hunters are indeed making birds smarter, what will this do long-term to bird populations and to the sport of hunting itself? Will these birds be increasingly harder to catch, for example? And how would this affect wild predators that live on these species? Møller predicts they’ll have a harder time. As for the answer, stay tuned.last_img read more

first_imgBrazil football great Pele has claimed that Barcelona star striker Neymar is ‘technically way better’ that Real Madrid talisman and four-time Ballon d’Or winner Cristiano Ronaldo.Ronaldo was named the Ballon d’Or winner for the fourth time in 2016. He also bagged the Men’s Player of the Year award from FIFA after guiding Real Madrid to Champions League victory and Portugal to Euro 2016 glory.Despite Ronaldo’s recent success and impressive career, Pele believes the Portugal star has only one advantage over Neymar i.e his aerial power.”The only problem that Neymar has is heading. Cristiano Ronaldo is not better than him. Technically, Neymar is way better, but (Ronaldo) is better when using the head. You don’t see Neymar scoring with the head, and that counts,” goal.com quoted Pele as saying.Pele, who smashed 77 goals for his country between 1957 and 1971, won three World Cups as a player and has been named Football Player of the Century by FIFA, Athlete of the Century by the International Olympic Committee, and a national treasure by Brazil’s government.last_img read more

first_imgDeondre Francois celebrating.MIAMI GARDENS, FL – DECEMBER 30: Deondre Francois #12 of the Florida State Seminoles celebrates their 33 to 32 win over the Michigan Wolverines during the Capitol One Orange Bowl at Sun Life Stadium on December 30, 2016 in Miami Gardens, Florida. (Photo by Marc Serota/Getty Images)Earlier Wednesday afternoon it was reported that Florida State quarterback Deondre Francois was reportedly thinking about transferring from the program. It didn’t take long for Francois to make his decision, as a new report indicates he’s leaving the team.According to Chris Hays and Chaunte’l Powell of the Orlando Sentinel, Francois has decided to take his talents elsewhere. The report indicates Francois plans to test the NFL waters before making a decision on his next team.Here’s more from the report.If Francois hears enough positive feedback from NFL teams about his professional potential, he will enter next year’s draft.Should he decide to use his final season of college eligibility, Francois is expected to look for a school that has an immediate need for a quarterback and a solid offensive line that would keep him upright for his last season.Francois already earned his degree and would be immediately eligible to play at a different college program should he go that route.It looks like Willie Taggart will be looking for a new starting quarterback next year. James Blackman returns for the Seminoles and will likely fill that role.[Orlando Sentinel]last_img read more

first_imgCarolyn Bolivar-Getson, Minister of Emergency Management, said Nova Scotians are to be commended for their safety preparations in advance of Tropical Storm Noel. “Early reports from across the province show that people were taking the storm warnings seriously,” said Ms. Bolivar-Getson. “I want to thank people for taking the time to prepare. The safety of Nova Scotians is paramount, and with the uncertainty surrounding a storm of Noel’s magnitude, it was critical to have supplies on hand for extended power outages.” Ms. Bolivar-Getson added that municipal emergency measures co-ordinators and volunteers did an excellent job and played a vital role as the storm approached the Maritimes. She also thanked broadcasters for communicating the importance of being prepared for the first 72 hours after an emergency. Early reports indicate that there was minimal damage to roads and buildings, although some coastal roads were flooded or had rocks blown onto them from the strong winds and waves. The public is still advised to avoid coastal areas where strong winds and waves are still present, and to stay away from downed power lines. Emergency management agencies were working through the night and continue to monitor weather reports and updates from municipalities.last_img read more

first_imgBISHKEK: No meeting was held between Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Pakistan’s Imran Khan during the informal dinner hosted by Kyrgyzstan President Sooronbay Jeenbekov for the leaders attending the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation summit in Bishkek on Thursday, news agency ANI has reported, quoting sources. PM Modi and Imran Khan did not even exchange pleasantries during the dinner hosted on the sidelines of the two-day summit, the report added. Also Read – IAF receives its first Rafale fighter jet from FrancePM Modi, on the sidelines of the summit, reiterated to Chinese President Xi Jinping India’s stand that Pakistan should take concrete action against terror before talks can resume. “Pakistan needs to create an atmosphere free of terror, but at this stage we do not see it happening. We expect Islamabad to take concrete action” to resume talks, foreign secretary Vijay Gokhale quoted the Prime Minister as telling Xi Jinping. China is Pakistan’s all-weather ally. Also Read – Cosmology trio win Nobel Physics Prize Before PM Modi left for Bishkek, India had ruled out any bilateral meeting with Pakistan. India has said cross-border terror must stop and Pakistan must take action against terror groups operating from its soil before dialogues can begin. Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan and Foreign Minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi had written separate letters to their Indian counterparts, ahead of the SCO summit, pushing for resumption of bilateral talks. After assuming office too, Imran Khan had written to PM Modi, seeking dialogue on all issues, including Kashmir. On Wednesday evening, after the ministry said PM Modi won’t fly over Pakistan on his way to Kyrgyzstan — a move seen as a snub — Islamabad said its airspace was open for the VVIP flight. Pakistan had closed its airspace in February after the Balakot air strikes. PM Modi’s flight, however, took a different route to Bishkek. India’s pressure on Pakistan to take action on terrorists acting from its soil spiked after the February 14 terror attack in Jammu and Kashmir’s Pulwama, in which 40 soldiers died. At last year’s SCO summit in China’s Qingdao, PM Modi shook hands and exchanged pleasantries with then Pakistan President Mamnoon Hussain, amid frosty bilateral relationship between the two sides. The Shanghai Cooperation Organisation is an eight-member group led by China that cooperates chiefly on trade and security.(With inputs from NDTV)last_img read more

first_imgFREDERICTON – The New Brunswick Liberals say there will be a candidate for Speaker when the legislature sits on Tuesday, an apparent break in the deadlock that makes it no clearer whether Premier Brian Gallant can cling to power.Acting Liberal house leader Lisa Harris made the announcement at a hastily called news conference Friday afternoon.“I am here to advise you that our caucus met today and agreed that out of respect for New Brunswickers we must avoid an unnecessary election and not face the house without a candidate for Speaker,” Harris said.“We also unanimously agreed to recommend to our leader that we meet the house on Tuesday, elect a Speaker, and present a progressive throne speech.”Harris did not say if the candidate for Speaker would come from Liberal ranks or if an opposition member would agree to do it. She refused to answer any questions.A name for Speaker must be given to the clerk of the legislature by 5 p.m. Monday.On Thursday, every opposition member and Liberal backbencher took their names off the list of Speaker candidates.Until now, no one has been willing to take the job because of the tight numbers in the legislature.The governing Liberals won 21 seats in last month’s election — one less than the Progressive Conservatives — while the Greens and People’s Alliance each won three.The Tories have already said they’ll vote against the throne speech, but Harris said it could still be passed.“Our caucus believes that we can earn 25 or more votes for this agenda. Our caucus will meet again on Monday to consider our next steps,” she said.If the Liberals were defeated on a confidence vote, the Tories would be given a chance to form government.Donald Wright, a political scientist at the University of New Brunswick, said Friday it’s hard to know what the Liberal strategy might be.“I think the Liberals are desperately trying to hold onto power, but they are running out of options at this point,” Wright said.“It would appear they are delaying the inevitable on the surface, unless they have some magic wand up their sleeve and some rabbit to pull out of a hat,” he said.Despite negotiations, the Liberals were unable to get any coalition deal with the Green party, and Gallant said he wouldn’t make a deal with the right-of-centre People’s Alliance.The People’s Alliance have already said they would provide stability to a Tory government for up to 18 months.last_img read more

28 September 2011An independent United Nations human rights expert today urged the Cambodian Government to carefully review a draft law that may hamper the work of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the South-east Asian nation. “The Government of Cambodia should not proceed with the draft NGO law in its present form,” Surya P. Subedi said as he presented his annual report to the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva.“Of course, as a sovereign country, Cambodia is entitled to enact a law on NGOs, but the decision to adopt a law to regulate NGOs and associations is a critical initiative which requires careful attention, given its long-term implications for the development of Cambodian society,” added Mr. Subedi, the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in Cambodia. Many of the civil society organizations in Cambodia have been playing an important role alongside the State in delivering key social services in the areas of education, health, rural development, sanitation, social welfare and the protection of natural resources and the environment, he noted.In a news release issued in Geneva, Mr. Subedi urged the Government to take into account the concerns raised during the consultation process before enacting the law, especially the “onerous” requirements for registration and the lack of clear criteria on which registration applications will be considered.In his report to the Council, the Special Rapporteur acknowledged that the overall situation of human rights had improved over the years in Cambodia, especially with the enactment of a number of key legislations.At the same time, he underscored that there was still “a great deal of work to be done to strengthen the rule of law, to accelerate the process of democratization and to enhance the capacity of parliament to hold executive to account.” read more